Hannah Franks – Work in Progress

A snapshot of the latest illustrations by final year Fashion Design student Hannah Franks.

Year 1 Fashion Design Shirt Project _ Original Copy

Three-week design project introducing basic pattern cutting, construction and deconstruction/reconstruction in order to learn the process of make and the importance of analysing and understanding garment silhouettes, shapes, details, seams and finishes.

All shirts are made from reclaimed or vintage fabrics and garments.

Shirt by Joshua Woods

Shirt by Poppy Cordon

Shirt by Eleanor Swan

2018 Fashion and Sustainability Forum

Join the conversation and let’s consider how we can change the future for the better. Don’t wait for someone else to solve the problem – respond to the challenge and become the expert.

This event is open to staff and students of Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton and selected guests and visitors. Tickets are free and the event is all day, so drop in to see one speaker, or stay all day. Availability of seating may be limited at some of the talks.

‘There are three things we touch upon every day that greatly impact the world around us: fuel (energy), food, and fashion. The first two are now wholeheartedly studied and worked upon. It is now fashion’s turn to inform and dazzle us with what is possible, to provide the moral imperative to change every aspect of producing and purchasing our second skin.’ (Paul Hawken)

The MA Fashion Design and Textile Design Interim Exhibition opens on the same day, showcasing our MA students’ work in progress, highlighting non-waste, zero-waste pattern cutting and sustainable design.

Agenda for the day:

11.00 – Start of the forum

11.05 – Julian Payne, Creative Director of De La Rue – and designer of the Jane Austen bank note! Talking about cash.

11.45 – Sarah Klymkiw, educator, researcher and campaigner from TRAID – Can We Fix Our Reationship with Clothes?

12.30 – Zoe Olivia John, lecturer, researcher and co-founder of Engage by Design, presenting her Strategies for Sustainable Fashion and Textile Design.

13.15 – Lunch

14.15 – Sarah Hellen, menswear designer, lecturer and researcher. Talking about her collaborations with local, independent, sustainable businesses in Wales.

15.00 – Katie Jones, knitwear designer mixing playful aesthetics with serious ethics. Talking about the two sides of sustainable fashion that relate to her brand.

15.45 – Catherine Weetman, Director of Re-think Solutions, and author of A Circular Economy Handbook for Business and Supply Chains. Talking about fast fashion and the circular economy.

16.30 – Kate Langham, lecturer and researcher, and formally Creative Director of Interface, recognised as one of the most sustainable businesses worldwide.. Talking about Interface’s global rebranding project and the development of Mission Zero.

17.15 – Charty Durrant, ex fashion editor of Vogue, The Sunday Times, and Fashion Consultant and Ethical Fashion Expert, ending the day with a call to arms, offering some groundbreaking new solutions for fashioning the future.

18.00 – 20.00 Drinks, networking and Private View for the MA Interim Exhibition. All welcome.

#wsa_sustainabilityforum

Spinexpo, Paris 2018

Woven and Knitted textile design students all report having a truly inspirational and engaging experience at Spinexpo, Paris. Presenting their work, networking and supporting the Spinexpo team were just few things the students experienced. Here’s an edited selection of what the student’s thought.

Contributions from Amy Halley, Emily Johnson, Amy Osgood, Amber Davis and Aimee Dye

    

Spinexpo Paris, known for featuring cutting edge technologies and having the highest technical expertise, was a great way for us to exhibit our work professionally, understand how a show of this scale works and to see how designers work with spinners to showcase yarns and their versatility. It was also an extremely valuable experience to speak to different companies including yarn producers and garment manufacturers. For example, from Wanziman Hong Kong Limited we learnt about an interesting new technology which imitates woven patterns into knitted fabric to create a unique material which has qualities of both knit and weave.

Yarn suppliers also exhibited new technologies, combinations of fibres and innovations including eco-friendly products, tape yarns, metallic textures, woollen yarns and paper qualities; the sheer volume of possibilities was eye opening.

   

Each stand was exciting and enticing, each seller had many potential buyers viewing their sample racks. It is perhaps easiest to envisage the buyers as children visiting a sweet shop for the first time; completely animated and engrossed in the products.

The Spinexpo team were extremely kind and encouraging to us. They made us feel a part of the family and become involved in every aspect of the show. A most wonderful experience, which has been invaluable.

Featuring WSA in previous fashion show @ London FREE RANGE FASHION WEEK

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcBynnZ7nEI&list=PLC9E089147D651485&index=9  

#freerangeshows #wsafashion @_MakeFuture @FreeRangeShows

Winchester school of Art Fashion graduate Linjing Feng

Graphic, minimal and angular Winchester school of Art Fashion Graduate Alumni Linjing Feng as featured on http://idolmag.co.uk offers up a lookbook which suggests experience far beyond her years.

LINJING FENG 2-330x500

LINJING FENG 7-330x500 LINJING FENG 6-330x500 LINJING FENG 9-330x500

Keeping to a monochrome palette, Linjing allows the cuts and lines to take the limelight. Shot against a white backdrop and black panelled beams, model Dani Kocianova from IMG Models rests on a misplaced ladder, a simple black box or sneaks off behind corners.

Overall the lookbook, shot by Iris Bjork, is an example of this young designer’s strong identity and promising future. Linjing Feng is definitely one to watch out for.

For full article by Mollie Pyne http://idolmag.co.uk/blog/introducing-linjing-feng 

 

WSA Printed Textiles Graduate Success

Printed Textiles graduate Elise Nichols has gained employment as an in-house Print Design Assistant at Marks and Spencers following her show at New Designers this year. Elise was one of 20 WSA textiles students to be selected to show on our stand at New Designers and her illustrative style garnered much attention. Her final collection was based on Grimms Fairy tales. #Congratulations Elise

Elise Nichols -2 Elise Nichols -1

 #wsa_alumni

Congratulations to all Fashion & Textile Student Graduates 2014

Highlights from Fashion & Textile Student Graduation Day 2014FTD_Grad_2014

#wsa_alumni

Intern Alert: Agi & Sam – Contemporary Textiles Based Menswear brand

Agi & Sam is a Contemporary Textiles Based Menswear brand that shows on schedule at London Collections Men and is based in London. With stockists including Matches, Barney’s, Oki-Ni, I.T. Hong Kong and many more. After recently collaborating with Topman, Agi & Sam received the Emerging Menswear Award at the British Fashion Awards 2013.

Agi and Sam S-S14 Agi & Sam are looking for an enthusiastic and versatile print or textiles intern to work primarily on their up-coming AW15 collection which shows at London Collections: Men in January 2015. Although with various other projects the role will involve a multitude of projects and collaboration, working closely with the designers.

They will be responsible for:
Print Production
• Print Sampling
• Textiles Sampling
• Innovation
• Research
• Digital Design
• Photography

Ideally we would like the student to be well versed in CAD: Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign.

Please send all CV’s and Digital Portfolios via: www.agiandsam.com

WSA level two student selected for JustFashion Competition sponsored by LEVI STRAUSS CO and supported by Katharine Hamnett

Nobody buys clothes out of pity,” says Katharine Hamnett, the fashion designer, appraising an outfit made by a student with ethical principles in mind. “People buy clothes they want to wear.

“They can’t look sustainable … sustainability is something you’ve got to sneak underneath.”

hay_fashion_2927402bHamnett is giving critical advice to budding designers in the final hours of a five-day workshop at the Hay Festival, during which fashion students have worked to create outfits with a focus on ethical production. A wide-ranging term, “ethical” used here means consideration of environmental factors, sustainability, animal welfare, traceability, fair wages and working conditions for manufacturers to name a few.

The Just Fashion Workshop is a joint project between the Hay Festival and the Environmental Justice Foundation, supported by Levi Strauss & Co and London College of Fashion’s Centre for Sustainable Fashion.

Ten students were chosen to spend a week working with sustainable fashion experts Martina Spetlova and Jessica Mor, before presenting their work on stage at the last weekend of the Hay Festival.

Chloé is a second-year student at Falmouth University who would love to have her own flock of sheep to produce her own wool. At the workshop site, just outside Hay-on-Wye, she has put in a week’s worth of long hours to create her ensemble. One of her main fashion influences is Stella McCartney. “What I like about Stella is that it’s sustainable, and she doesn’t scream and shout about her ideas of animal welfare … she just says it should be the norm, and I like that. It’s just done.”

Chloé’s approach is different from the one taken by her fellow (Winchester School of Art) student Filipa Castilho, who is developing a new way to recycle denim. There are already organisations that break down old clothing into reusable fibres, but Filipa points out that this process is time- and energy-consuming. To shorten the recycling process, she has cut old pairs of jeans into strips, woven into the back of a new denim shirt-dress.

“Sustainability in fashion is not only about organic fibres or recycling garments,” she says. “There are many different ways to help solve a big problem. This workshop is a good opportunity to bring different approaches to the situation together, and find different perspectives on what can help.

“It’s been really lovely. I usually think a lot about equality, politics and human rights, and usually I don’t take any action. But the conversations we’ve had here made me think that even if I’m only one person, and I can’t solve the problem, if I take some action I can help in a small part – and actually do something instead of just being theoretical. If my idea was implemented in mass production, it could help a lot.”

The students had their designs modelled on stage at the Hay Festival as part of a discussion about the future of sustainable fashion with Katharine Hamnett and Dilys Williams.

Edited version of article written By 

To read the full article: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/hay-festival/10867069/Ethical-fashion-any-colour-as-long-as-its-green.html?fb